About Sequoia & Kings Canyon Weather

Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks have a large range of elevations, and a corresponding range of climates. The two main areas visited are the foothills and the middle elevations, where the sequoias are located. The foothills are mild in winter, warm in spring and fall, and very hot in summer. Most precipitation occurs from January to May. The statistics below are most accurate for the foothills region. Further up, at 5,000 to 7,000 feet, the sequoia zone, the temperatures are 15-20F cooler. Deep snows occur in the winter months, and can remain until late May or June.



Month Avg High Avg Low Record High Record Low Avg Pcpt
January 583684/197620/19494.97"
February 623985/197722/19894.72"
March 654286/198626/19534.95"
April 704596/200428/19982.14"
May 8052105/198433/19641.06"
June 9060114/196138/19550.42"
July 9766113/196042/19480.10"
August 9766114/199646/19760.11"
September 9160112/195537/19770.67"
October 8051103/199630/19711.42"
November 664193/196625/19942.79"
December 593682/195817/19903.15"
Disclaimer about the stats

Visitation Seasons

The spring starts off cold and snowy at the higher elevations. Snows may be found on the roads at any time, sometimes closing them for short periods. The real visitation season in the parks starts around Memorial Day, when most services go into full swing.
The summer is the season of highest visitation. The higher elevations are usually pleasant, but the lower elevations in the foothills and canyons can get quite hot. The campgrounds in the Giant Forest area and all lodging are usually full. However, neither of the parks ever feels overly crowded.
The fall is a great time to visit. Crowds disappear after Labor Day and temperatures remain comfortable through October. Things turn cold and possibly snowy at the higher elevations in November.
The winter is quiet and often beautiful time to visit. Temperatures are low and snow is common in the sequoia groves. Roads are plowed and kept open except for short periods during or after major snowfalls.


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